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British Royal house implicated in World Cup corruption scandal – FIFA report

Former British Prime Minister David Cameron and Prince William implicated in World Cup corruption scandal – FIFA report

British Prime Minister David Cameron and Prince William

The newly published full version of a report on the FIFA 2018/2022 bidding process alleges the former UK PM tried to persuade South Korea to trade votes in a clear violation of FIFA ethics rules. The publication comes after the report was leaked to German media.

The investigation into corruption allegations and other wrongdoings by bidders to host the 2018 and 2022 World Cups was carried out in 2014 by the former chairman of the FIFA Ethics Committee Investigatory Chamber, US prosecutor Michael Garcia.

The report alleges that the fate of England’s 2018 FIFA bid was decided at the highest level of the British government, with former Prime Minister David Cameron and Prince William being personally implicated in breaching FIFA ethics code by colluding with officials from South Korea, which sought to host the tournament in 2022.

Cameron reportedly met with then-FIFA vice president Mong-Joon Chung not long before the December 2010 vote and “asked Mr. Chung to vote for England’s bid.” Chung allegedly promised to cast a vote for England on condition the English delegation returned the favor and backed South Korea as 2022 World Cup host.

The conversation is said to have taken place in Prince William’s room at a posh Swiss hotel, with the Duke of Cambridge himself reportedly having been present at the meeting.

Prince William is not the only British royal to be featured in the report.

According to one of the most eyebrow-raising allegations cited there, the former president of the South American Football Confederation, Nicolas Leoz asked the English delegation if it was possible to be bestowed with an honorary knighthood.

Read: The Full Report on the Inquiry into the 2018/2022 FIFA World Cup Bidding

 

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